LOGO DESIGN PROCESS CASE STUDY

Logo design for PureRein, a healthy food producer



The challenge (logo design brief)

PureRein is a producer and distributor of healthy food. Its founder wished for a classically simple logomark. He likened my work to that of the Polish logo design legend – Karol Śliwka – and stated that this was the style he wanted. An addition requirement was for the mark to be easy to reproduce in single colour as to reduce the cost of packaging (which I've designed as well).

The solution

I aimed to give the design an iconic quality. It had to be bold, clear and understandable at first glance. The design merges a flower and a fork. These elements represent food, taste, nature and happiness. The logotype font is rounded, organic-like in shapes.


I always start with researching the subject of the logo and competition logos. I ask the client some questions, that help me to learn about the brand and the client’s expectations and needs. Then I start drafting the ideas, often starting with a mind map of possible connotations.


Research and Drafting

These sketches are a selection from two rounds of design propositions. Although the final concept with the "fork-plant" was created during the first round and the client instantly liked it, he asked for a couple other ideas – wondering if the fork didn't point to much to restaurant businesses. You can see mainly some food baskets, fruits, vegetables, leaves and suns here. And generally many round and organic shapes.



advecto logo design case study draft concept sketches

After arriving with promising sketches, I redraw them digitally. Working at the computer, new concepts are also developed. I choose the ones (it’s not a set number) that are the best fit for the brand and look the best. If the client picks one, I develop it further. If none appeal to them enough, I work on new options, until we find the right one.



First round of logo design propositions

Working on the first four designs I felt what style I wanted to achieve: natural, easy, positive and slightly traditional.


My initial concept was a waived food basket that was also an apple. It seemed fun, with the apple appearing so big in the basket and the retro aesthetic would communicate nature and tradition.




The second iteration of this idea was lighter, less complicated. Pointing at the fitness values of the food. As a bonus, the lower part of the basket resembled a hand, highlighting the careful production and selection of products.




The second concept was more decorative, with evident symmetry and repeated shapes. It pictured a fruit turning into a sun. This symbolised life, energy and growth.




Lastly I presented this (ultimately chosen) design. The concept - merging a flower and a fork - was as simple as the others, but the form was the most basic one, with no outlines - just two simple shapes combined for a simple "puzzle".




When the logo design is chosen, I explore it, according to client suggestions. I also examine it myself to see if it can be improved in any way and if it is well constructed. Sometimes some new variants emerge.



Second round of logo designs

As I've mentioned, the client didn't have the ease of mind yet and asked for some other options. I presented another 12 variants (centered around a couple concepts). Below are a couple of my favourites. Two "sunny" designs, a star made of goji berries (one of the main products of the company), simple leaves resembling a circle of butterflies, and the letter "e" made out of a leaf (the name initially was supposed to be "EcoRein").



advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions
advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions
advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions
advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions
advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions


Refining the chosen logo design

Eventually we went back to the fork-plant concept, but there were still three areas which needed work:

1. The client wanted to see some green options of the mark. We picked a design with two shades of green, although later we saw that a pure black logo (and "label" version seen at the end of this article) looks the best.

2. The client thought about a simple sans serif font to accompany the simple logo shape. I searched through my font collection and picked a selection of those, but I also threw a slightly rounded humanist font into the mix and that one ended up being chosen.

3. The last thing was balancing the composition. The leaves got bigger, to make the weight of the two parts of the logomark visually equal.


advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions

Once the logo design is ready, I design the monochrome, negative and other needed versions. The client receives the vector logo files by e-mail. I develop the Logo Book (defining the construction, colours etc. of the logo), if ordered.


advecto logo design case study presenting revisions, modifications according to client suggestions

Above is the horizontal PureRein logo version. Handy i.e. for uses with limited space, like an address footer. For situations where the brand logo has to be prominent, see below:


The "Label" version

While working on the package designs, the "label" version was developed. It is the basic logo, cut out in a black square. The purpose of this version is for the logo to really stand out as the main element of the packaging, so that the shoppers would acknowledge the new brand.



advecto logo design case study showing negative logo version for use on dark backgrounds